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Michiyo Tsujimura: Google Doodle Celebrates Michiyo Tsujimura’s 133rd Birthday
Today’s (September 17, 2021 ) Google Doodle is dedicated to Japanese educator and biochemist Michiyo Tsujimura. Google Doodle Today: Google Friday celebrated the 133rd birthday of Japanese educator and biochemist Michiyo Tsujimura with a beautiful doodle. Who is Michiyo Tsujimura? Tsujimura was born in 1888 at Okegawa in Saitama Prefecture, Japan and She died in ... Read more
 
Michiyo Tsujimura: Google Doodle Celebrates Michiyo Tsujimura’s 133rd Birthday
Michiyo Tsujimura (Image Credit Google)

Today’s (September 17, 2021 ) Google Doodle is dedicated to Japanese educator and biochemist Michiyo Tsujimura.

Google Doodle Today: Google Friday celebrated the 133rd birthday of Japanese educator and biochemist Michiyo Tsujimura with a beautiful doodle. 

Who is Michiyo Tsujimura?

Tsujimura was born in 1888 at Okegawa in Saitama Prefecture, Japan and She died in Toyohashi on 1 June 1969 at the age of 81.

Michiyo Tsujimura was a Japanese agriculture scientist and biochemist whose research focused on the components of green tea. She was the first woman in Japan to receive a doctoral degree in agriculture.

Have you ever wondered why green tea tastes so bitter when steeped for too long? Thanks to Japanese educator and biochemist Michiyo Tsujimura, and her groundbreaking research into the nutritional benefits of green tea, science has the answers. Today’s Doodle celebrates Michiyo Tsujimura on her 133rd birthday. 

Also Read: Google Doodle Celebrates Sarla Thukral 107th Birthday.

Michiyo Tsujimura was born on this day in 1888 in Okegawa, Saitama Prefecture, Japan. She spent her early career teaching science. In 1920, she chased her dream of becoming a scientific researcher at Hokkaido Imperial University where she began to analyze the nutritional properties of Japanese silkworms. 

A few years later, Tsujimura transferred to Tokyo Imperial University and began researching the biochemistry of green tea alongside Dr. Umetaro Suzuki, famed for his discovery of vitamin B1. Their joint research revealed that green tea contained significant amounts of vitamin C—the first of many yet unknown molecular compounds in green tea that awaited under the microscope. In 1929, she isolated catechin—a bitter ingredient of tea. Then, the next year she isolated tannin, an even more bitter compound. These findings formed the foundation for her doctoral thesis, “On the Chemical Components of Green Tea” when she graduated as Japan’s first woman doctor of agriculture in 1932.

Outside of her research, Dr. Tsujimura also made history as an educator when she became the first Dean of the Faculty of Home Economics at Tokyo Women’s Higher Normal School in 1950. Today, a stone memorial in honor of Dr.Tsujimura’s achievements can be found in her birthplace of Okegawa City. Google Wrote on its website.

Happy Birthday, Michiyo Tsujimura!